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Spring Concert

Spring Concert

Book Tickets

Sunday 18 Mar 20183:00pm Book Now

City of Peterborough Symphony Orchestra presents:


Spring Concert


Our greatest English composers ponder the past, the present and the future


Britten/Rossini – Matinees Musicales


Elgar – Cello Concerto


Vaughan Williams – Symphony No.5


Sunday 18th March 2018 at 3pm


The Queen Katharine Academy Concert Hall

(was the Voyager Concert Hall)


Mountsteven Ave, Walton, PE4 6HX


Tickets:

Adult £13.50;

Adult + one or two children at £13.50 total

Concessions/Students £11.50 /Students/U18 £5




Britten celebrating Rossini, Elgar still in shock after WW1 and Vaughan Williams’ vision of eternity.  A feast of passion and feeling.  Benjamin Britten, the greatest English opera composer of his time celebrated Rossini, the greatest Italian opera composer of his own time, in his “Matinees Musicales”, after Rossini’s “Soirees Musicales” based on tunes from William Tell.  The suite combines the wit and tunefulness  of Rossini with the exquisite and brilliant orchestration of Britten.  Edward Elgar’s unique and intimate cello concerto is rooted in a moment of time.  In 1919, disillusioned by the war, Elgar poured his feelings into the concerto.  It was a lament for a lost world, haunted by autumnal sadness, but the sadness of compassion, not pessimism, with a heart-rending slow movement that rivals Nimrod in its intensity.


We are delighted to welcome Charlotte McAuliffe as soloist, one of our city’s foremost musicians, winner of Peterborough (2007), Oundle (2010) and King’s School (2011) Young Musician of the Year awards.


Seen as a response to WW1, in his Symphony No. 5 Vaughan Williams describes the nature of true peace in the hearts of those, who, like Christian in The Pilgrim’s Progress, have faced their conflicts and survived.  The symphony reflects the visionary side of the composer’s genius and remains the most complete statement of his fundamental faith.  The cor anglais speaks of arrival in a heavenly place of ultimate peace, and we finally arrive in heaven with all pain banished, as the strings weave  harmoniously skywards into ethereal bliss.